doctorroseandalltimelow:

IF YOU DONT LIKE STEVEN MOFFAT THEN COme sit next to me and we’ll criticize his shitty ass misogynistic racist heteronormative writing together even though he can’t take crit worth a shit.

tvscripts:

chris pratt does the ice bucket challenge, hilarity ensues

floozys:

my feminist goal is not to convince men that girls are of value, my feminist goal is to achieve a future where the judgement of our value isn’t in the hands of men. 

(Source: floozys)

fandom thoughts

fozmeadows:

therisingtithes:

fozmeadows:

So, here’s a thought:

The types of fandom that are most often considered traditional and acceptable, and which are often either male-dominated or coded as masculine, tend to be acquisitive, whether in terms of knowledge (obscure trivia) or merchandise (collectibles). Whereas, by contrast, the types of fandom most often considered insincere, non-serious or “unreal”, and which are often either female-dominated or coded as feminine, tend to be creative, such as making costumes, writing fanfic and drawing fanart

Which is arguably an interesting expression of gender dynamics within fandom, in the sense of being a direct response to gender representation within the canon of particular franchises: namely, that because men, and particularly straight white cismen, are so ubiquitous within popular narrative(s), they have less need to create personal fan interpretations in order to see themselves represented, or to correct/ameliorate stereotypical portrayals; whereas women - and, indeed, members of any other group likely to suffer from poor representation - do.

Which isn’t to say that it’s impossible to be both an acquisitive and a creative fan - not by any stretch of the imagination. Nor am I trying to say that the only reason someone might be an acquisitive fan is because they’re complacent about issues of bias and representation, or that the only reason someone might be a creative fan is because they want to address an issue in the canon. Some people like to collect, some like to make, and some like both, or neither. It’s fine! But I do think that, when it comes to conversations about Fake Geek Girls and what being a “real fan” means - conversations which tend to be strongly gendered - the split between acquisition/creation tends to follow gender lines, too: that guys who know All The Facts and buy All The Merch are the REAL fans, whereas girls who just dress up and tell silly headcanon stories aren’t, and that maybe, there’s an interesting reason for why this might be. 

[bolded for emphasis]

This is interesting. Especially because an extrapolation from that is that the ‘orthodox’, ‘traditional’ mode of interacting with a work - knowing, staying close to the first interpretation, valuing the refusal to budge from those first interpretations over being inclusive and fluid - is therefore masculine-coded, but it’s feminine-coded to be canonically fluid, intensely metacritical, artistically motivated, and to encourage creative deconstruction and reconstruction

Where 'MascFandom' is a kind of Canon Literalism, 'FemFandom' by comparison is Canon Exegesis

Which is probably a sliver of the backlash that grows into the Fake Geek Girl conversation - that people think the ‘text’ of their fandom ‘faith’ shouldn’t be tampered with or recontextualized, whereas other people insist that it has to evolve to meet the needs of the people who it serves? 

I’m not sure how it accommodates for works like Welcome to Night Vale (a really good place, I think to discuss fandoms and their interactions with media), where the literalism of its canon is the establishment that blanks are required to be filled in by the audience. Fan-created artwork of any type, arguably, is as valuable a ‘history’ of Night Vale as Cecil’s radio show, because so many details are up in the air anyway, and have to be informed by the information you do still have (e.g. nothing says Cecil can’t be a blob, so what would it mean if he were a blob?).

This is absolutely fascinating to me now, and will surely make up a large part of actual notes I have about what I can now call ‘exegetical fandom theory’ and how people interact with and alter media.

Reblogging for commentary, and because the divide between literalism/exegesis is another fascinating lens through which to examine both fandom generally, and its gender dynamics. 

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cunninghats:

girls don’t like boys. girls like dresses with pockets and guardians of the galaxy

Natalie Dormer at the Glamour Women of the Year Awards at Berkeley Square Gardens in London, England (June 3, 2014)

(Source: jacktfrost)

Happy birthday, Harry Potter!


To celebrate Harry’s birthday (and my undying love for the series), I made my own covers! I created patterns (Thanks for the inspiration Scandinavia!) using a significant object from each book. I used those in the movies as reference and digitally painted them. You can view the whole project here! :)

(It’s already July 31 here in the Philippines. Haha.)

(Source: raxenne)

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robbstark:

  • sansa ruling the north and the vale (◡‿◡✿)
  • myrcella ruling king’s landing and the westerlands (◡‿◡✿)
  • asha ruling the iron islands (◡‿◡✿)
  • margaery ruling the reach (◡‿◡✿)
  • arianne ruling dorne (◡‿◡✿)
  • daenerys ruling essos (◡‿◡✿)